Focus: TB

'Open for Dicovery', our current exhibition, features the work of Crick scientists Anne O'Garra and Luiz Carvalho. Scroll down for detailed information about their current research, related news stories and events, and recommended reading.

Science in conversation: TB


Featured scientist: Anne O'Garra

Anne O’Garra in the Immunoregulation and Infection Laboratory

Anne O’Garra in the Immunoregulation and Infection Laboratory (Click to view larger image)
© Thomas Farnetti / 2017 / Wellcome

Anne O'Garra is an Associate Research Director at the Francis Crick Institute and Senior Group Leader of the Immunoregulation and Infection Laboratory.

The lab is currently researching the molecular mechanisms underlying the development and function of discrete subsets of immune cells that produce different cytokines protective against pathogens, and the induction and function of a regulatory cytokine, IL-10.

Read more about the research of the Immunoregulation and Infection Laboratory.

Featured scientist: Luiz Carvalho

Luiz Carvalho next to a mass spectrometer in the Mycobacterial Metabolism and Antibiotic Research Laboratory

Luiz Carvalho next to a mass spectrometer in the Mycobacterial Metabolism and Antibiotic Research Laboratory (Click to view larger image)
© Ben Gilbert / 2017 / Wellcome

Luiz Carvalho is Group Leader of the Mycobacterial Metabolism and Antibiotic Research Laboratory. The group focuses on the discovery and characterisation of essential biochemical, metabolic and pharmacological processes at both the molecular and cellular levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb).

In 2011 Luiz Carvalho moved to the Medical Research Council (MRC)'s National Institute for Medical Research (now part of the Francis Crick Institute) to establish his laboratory working on how Mtb enzymes work, how they are inhibited by antibiotics and how they are linked together to form the metabolic network that makes Mtb such a successful pathogen.

Luiz has been awarded an MRC Centenary Award and the 2014 Merck Irving S. Sigal Award.

Read more about the research of the Mycobacterial Metabolism and Antibiotic Research Laboratory.


Find out more

Upcoming events

  • World Immunology Day: Collaborating to Beat Lung Infections and Asthma
    Friday 5 May, 7 - 9:30pm

    FREE ADMISSION

    Why do some people exposed to allergens like pollen and pet dander develop asthma, while others do not? Why do some people infected by the same bacteria and viruses go on to develop diseases such as tuberculosis or flu?

    These are questions that fascinate scientists at the Crick and beyond so to mark the International Day of Immunology 2017 join the Francis Crick Institute and Nature Research at this free panel discussion.

    Join us for a lively discussion followed by a free drinks reception where you can chat to our panellists in a more relaxed setting. Book your free place.

The Francis Crick Institute Flagship lectures are open to scientists from other institutes and universities in and around London. The upcoming lectures related to this topic are:

  • 21 September 2017 - Peter Piot, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 

View more information about the Flagship lectures.

Recent news stories

View further stories relating to the Crick's research into tuberculosis.

Further suggested reading

Books

Davis, DM (2013) The Compatibility Gene. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 

Bynum, H (2012) Spitting blood: the history of tuberculosis. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dormandy, T (2000) The white death: a history of tuberculosis. New York: New York University Press.

Bryder, L (1988) Below the magic mountain : a social history of tuberculosis in twentieth-century Britain. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Papers

Cliff, JM; Kaufmann, SHE; McShane, H; van Helden, P and O'Garra, A (2015)
The human immune response to tuberculosis and its treatment: a view from the blood. Immunological Reviews 264, 88-102  

Blankley, S; Berry, MPR; Graham, CM; Bloom, CI; Lipman, M and O'Garra, A (2014)
The application of transcriptional blood signatures to enhance our understanding of the host response to infection: the example of tuberculosis. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences369, 20130427

Dye, C and O'Garra, A (2014)
The science of infectious diseases. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences369, 20140055

O'Garra, A (2013)
Driving change in tuberculosis research: an interview with Anne O'Garra. Disease Models & Mechanisms 6, 6-8  

Banchereau, J; Pascual, V and O'Garra, A (2012)
From IL-2 to IL-37: the expanding spectrum of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Nature Immunology 13, 925-931 

Young, DB; Comas, I and de Carvalho, LPS (2015)
Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences 2, 6

Prosser, GA; Larrouy-Maumus, G and de Carvalho, LPS (2014)
Metabolomic strategies for the identification of new enzyme functions and metabolic pathways. EMBO Reports 15, 657-669

Berry, M.P.R. et al. (2010)
An Interferon-inducible Neutrophil-driven Blood Transcriptional Signature in Human Tuberculosis, Nature, 466: 973-77

Prosser, G.A. et al. (2016) Glutamate Racemase is the Primary Target of β-chloro-D-alanine in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, doi: 10.1128/AAC.01249-16.

Other

O'Garra, G. (2011)
Immune signatures in disease and visions for their future use. Mill Hill Essays (2011/12) 

Young, D. and Gagneux, S.
Living and dying with the tubercle bacillus. Mill Hill Essays (2009)  

Read the Francis Crick Institute's Use of Animals in Research Policy.

Explore the full list of Crick research topics.

Come face to face with life-changing science at the Crick. Join our mailing list to receive updates about the Crick's activities and to hear about our free public events and exhibitions. Read our full Privacy Policy.