Chromosome Biology Interest Group

 

The blueprint of life is encoded in two metres of DNA, organised into chromosomes that provide genes with functional context. Almost all human disorders involve aberrations in chromosome function, which vary from mutations to dysregulation of entire gene expression networks, from rearrangements to losses or gains of entire chromosomes.

Image showing mitotic cell division in which two DNA masses segregate to opposite poles.

The Chromosome Biology Interest Group studies how chromosome integrity and behaviour are regulated in healthy and pathological states, providing an informed rationale for disease diagnosis, prevention and treatment. The group uses diverse methodologies and model systems to study DNA replication and repair, chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, epigenetics and chromatin architecture, transcriptional regulation and chromosome evolution.

Our wide-ranging expertise provides a holistic view of chromosome function within the organism, thereby accelerating scientific discovery and clinical translation opportunities. We inspire and engage the public, sharing our fascination with chromosomes, the iconic symbol of the life sciences. In addition, we collaborate extensively, often with scientists in different research disciplines, resulting in paradigm shifts and high profile research output.

By offering a rigorous training programme and seminar series comprising experts in our field, we aim to create the best future scientific leaders. We envisage that our distinctive research approach will lead to lasting benefits for human health.

For more information, or to be added to the Interest Group mailing list, please contact Aileen Nelson (Aileen.Nelson@crick.ac.uk).

Upcoming seminars:

  • 25 October, 12:00 - Gary Karpen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 'Biophysics and Genome Regulation: Is Chromatin Just a Phase?'
  • 1 November, 13:00 -  David Bentley, University of Colorado, 'Speed matters! Transcriptional elongation, co-transcriptional RNA folding and mRNA processing'